Brittany Hopkins

Wichita State University is home to nearly 5,000 first-generation students, individuals whose caregivers weren’t able to complete a college degree and who lack the firsthand experience to tackle college life. To help with their transition, Wichita State offers a number of resources to first-gen students to support them during their time in college, including F1RST GEN SHOCKERS.

Hear from Brittany Hopkins, graduate student success specialist in the Graduate School and a current employee at Wichita State who went to college as a first-gen student, about the first-gen experience.

Wichitans visit campus during Open Streets ICT

For a second year, Wichita State will show off its unique cultural and educational assets while welcoming the community to campus during Open Streets ICT – WSU and Shocker Neighborhood on April 14. 

Open Streets ICT is a community-building event on a closed street, intended to promote healthy active living and social engagement. The event is free and open to the public. 

Ava Wilkie

Ava Wilkie, senior at Wichita East High School, is the winner of the 2024 Lenora N. McGregor Endowed Scholarship at Wichita State University.

The Lenora N. McGregor Endowed Scholarship awards up to $26,000 over four years to an incoming freshman student who has demonstrated academic excellence, has an academic vision for the future and who expresses an interest in advancing knowledge through individual learning. The McGregor Scholar agrees to maintain active membership in WSU’s Dorothy and Bill Cohen Honors College.

Mental Health Advocate: School of Social Work

Suspenders4Hope, a program developed at Wichita State University, is highlighting different departments and individuals on campus who are advocates for mental health in hopes that their stories will inspire others to continue supporting one another in the community.

The WSU School of Social Work (SSW) is being recognized for its support of the mental health of students, faculty, staff and health care professionals.

Faculty and students attend the 22nd annual K-INBRE Symposium

Four undergraduate students from Wichita State University were among the 18 students recognized at the 22nd annual Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) Symposium in Manhattan, Kansas.

The WSU students who were recognized:

  • Yousaf Khan, senior in chemistry
  • Alia Michaelis, senior in biochemistry
  • Bao Nhu To, junior in biology and health science
  • Julie Tran, junior in chemistry
Valerie Thompson

Dr. Valerie J. Thompson is an assistant professor Wichita State’s College of Applied Studies. Her experiences as a practitioner in higher education — and her lens as a Black woman scholar — help inform how she sees the world.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Robert E. Weems Jr.

Robert E. Weems Jr. is a faculty member in WSU’s History Department and is the Willard W. Garvey Distinguished Professor of Business History. Weems says African American history is troubling but also demonstrates the resilience of Black Americans.

“As someone who came of age during the late 1960s, over the years as a history professor, I have sought to contribute to the knowledge base associated with the African American experience” Weems said.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Dr. Rhonda K. Lewis

Dr. Rhonda Lewis is a professor of psychology at Wichita State University. She says her identity as a Black individual has influenced everything she does in her work as an instructor and researcher.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Collage of the fall 2024 Koch Scholars

Ten high school students from Kansas, Missouri and Texas have been awarded the Koch Scholarship at Wichita State University, starting in the fall 2024 semester.

Each scholar each will be awarded $30,000 to attend WSU over four years.

Fall 2024 Koch Scholarship:

  • Alexander Baird, Campus High School, electrical engineering (Haysville, Kansas)
  • Samir Barraza, Colby High School, computer science
  • Carson Brewer, Andover Central High School, computer science
  • Tyler Casely-Hayford, Stephen F. Austin High School (Richmond, Texas), mechanical engineering
  • Mayce Cashman, Andale High School, finance
  • Sophie Clarke, Eisenhower High School, computer science
  • Kayla Gann, Smithville High School (Smithville, Missouri), accounting
  • Jack Rue, Wichita Northwest High School, computer engineering
  • Israel Torres, Wichita Northeast Magnet High School, mechanical engineering
  • Erin Vance, Wichita Trinity Academy, mechanical engineering
Workers make progress on the Shocker Success Center

From the center of campus to downtown Wichita, Wichita State University’s footprint continues to grow and offer new opportunities for students and our community. As the spring semester rolls on, you will notice ongoing and new construction across our 330 acres and beyond.

Projects currently under way:

  • Renderings released for Wichita Biomedical Campus
  • Shocker Success Center
  • Ablah Library
  • Wichita State Connect
  • Parking Services
  • Millie Marcus Annex
  • Intensive English Center + Annex
  • NIAR Hub for Advanced Manufacturing Research (HAMR)
  • University Stadium (formerly Cessna Stadium)
  • Wilkins Stadium