Valerie Thompson

Dr. Valerie J. Thompson is an assistant professor Wichita State’s College of Applied Studies. Her experiences as a practitioner in higher education — and her lens as a Black woman scholar — help inform how she sees the world.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Robert E. Weems Jr.

Robert E. Weems Jr. is a faculty member in WSU’s History Department and is the Willard W. Garvey Distinguished Professor of Business History. Weems says African American history is troubling but also demonstrates the resilience of Black Americans.

“As someone who came of age during the late 1960s, over the years as a history professor, I have sought to contribute to the knowledge base associated with the African American experience” Weems said.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Dr. Rhonda K. Lewis

Dr. Rhonda Lewis is a professor of psychology at Wichita State University. She says her identity as a Black individual has influenced everything she does in her work as an instructor and researcher.

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

Collage of the fall 2024 Koch Scholars

Ten high school students from Kansas, Missouri and Texas have been awarded the Koch Scholarship at Wichita State University, starting in the fall 2024 semester.

Each scholar each will be awarded $30,000 to attend WSU over four years.

Fall 2024 Koch Scholarship:

  • Alexander Baird, Campus High School, electrical engineering (Haysville, Kansas)
  • Samir Barraza, Colby High School, computer science
  • Carson Brewer, Andover Central High School, computer science
  • Tyler Casely-Hayford, Stephen F. Austin High School (Richmond, Texas), mechanical engineering
  • Mayce Cashman, Andale High School, finance
  • Sophie Clarke, Eisenhower High School, computer science
  • Kayla Gann, Smithville High School (Smithville, Missouri), accounting
  • Jack Rue, Wichita Northwest High School, computer engineering
  • Israel Torres, Wichita Northeast Magnet High School, mechanical engineering
  • Erin Vance, Wichita Trinity Academy, mechanical engineering
Workers make progress on the Shocker Success Center

From the center of campus to downtown Wichita, Wichita State University’s footprint continues to grow and offer new opportunities for students and our community. As the spring semester rolls on, you will notice ongoing and new construction across our 330 acres and beyond.

Projects currently under way:

  • Renderings released for Wichita Biomedical Campus
  • Shocker Success Center
  • Ablah Library
  • Wichita State Connect
  • Parking Services
  • Millie Marcus Annex
  • Intensive English Center + Annex
  • NIAR Hub for Advanced Manufacturing Research (HAMR)
  • University Stadium (formerly Cessna Stadium)
  • Wilkins Stadium
Lexi Jensen

Lexi Jensen enjoys the amenities available in Wichita and the campus environment and academic offerings at Wichita State University. In her first months on campus, she dove into activities such as rowing and the Immersive Leadership Institute.

Shockers come from all over, and students from selected major metropolitan areas in Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas may be eligible to receive regular in-state tuition at Wichita State. Read what some out-of-state students have to say about why they chose WSU — and Wichita — as their new home.

Wichita State is joining more than 200 of the nation’s leading artificial intelligence (AI) stakeholders to participate in a Department of Commerce initiative to support the development and deployment of trustworthy and safe AI.

Established by the Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the U.S. AI Safety Institute Consortium (AISIC) brings together AI creators and users, academics, government and industry researchers, and civil society organizations to meet this mission.

President Rick Muma, Kevin Saal and members of United Way present the money raised for the United Way Champions for Literacy 2024 campaign

Our community helped raise $15,000 toward alleviating illiteracy in Shocker Neighborhood through United Way’s Champions of Literacy initiative.

The total amount raised was announced at the Feb. 7 Shocker men’s basketball game against UTSA, where United Way alongside President Rick Muma and Kevin Saal, director of athletics, presented the money raised.

Shockers can still donate to the campaign through the following teams:

Reading helps children build cognitive skills, gain a deeper understanding of the world, improve their concentration and fuel their imagination. As an educational driver for the state of Kansas, Wichita State is committed to helping students of all ages achieve success and become the leaders of tomorrow.

BreAnn Gilkey

BreAnn Gilkey is an associate clinical professor, field practicum director and undergraduate coordinator in WSU’s School of Social Work. She says her experience as a Black woman lets her know it’s imperative that she shows up for all her students. Read more about BreAnn’s experience.

“Representation matters, and it helps to be a face out there that looks like some of the students that come through the social work program,” BreAnn said “However, I am here for all of my students.”

Black History Month provides an opportunity for contemplation, learning and raising awareness about the extensive and varied history of the Black community. Wichita State is embracing the rich tapestry of history and heritage by highlighting some of the amazing Black educators who make a difference in students’ lives every day.

The opening to "Fully Dimensional: Artists of the Outdoor Sculpture Collection" exhibition.

A grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) will help the Ulrich Museum of Art celebrate the Martin H. Bush Outdoor Sculpture Collection as part of the museum’s 50th anniversary special programming.

“Fully Dimensional: Artists of the Outdoor Sculpture Collection” is a multimedia exhibition at Wichita State University that celebrates 35 artists of the sculpture collection and explores elements of their larger bodies of work.

It is supported by a $10,000 grant from the NEA Challenge America awards.